working my way through Reacher.

(Presumably you saw my Die Trying post yesterday.)

I am working my way through the entire Jack Reacher series by Lee Child, slowly but very surely. And I’m having to start taking notes on which one included which action, because there are so many and I was out of order. Here they are in the order Child recommends:

  1. Killing Floor: our introduction to ex-military cop Jack Reacher, on the roam, who is arrested in Margraves, Georgia for a murder he didn’t commit. When he finally finds out who the victim was, it becomes his case to solve.
  2. Die Trying: Reacher stops to help a woman struggling with her dry-cleaning on a Chicago sidewalk, and gets kidnapped along with her. She turns out to be a well-connected FBI agent, and they have to work together to escape a truly bizarre criminal scheme.
  3. Tripwire, which I’m listening to now. Begins in Key West but quickly moves to New York City, where Reacher reconnects with an old friend and works to solve a mystery that stretches back to the jungles of the Vietnam War.
  4. Running Blind (yes, in two posts): A series of career women with the U.S. Army are dying, and the authorities are sure Reacher is their killer. This makes it his case to solve.
  5. Echo Burning, my very first Reacher book! I fell in love, not only with Reacher himself, but with the setting: far West Texas, where the desert of my home state meets Mexico and lawlessness reigns. An attractive housewife in a horrible predicament needs Reacher’s help, professional killers are on their way, and the final showdown remains one of my favorites.
  6. Without Fail, up next
  7. Persuader: A ghost from Reacher’s past reappears on a busy city sidewalk. He’s supposed to be dead. Reacher undertakes to fix the problem.
  8. The Enemy
  9. One Shot: A sniper is killing wantonly in Indiana. With all the evidence pointing to one man, it’s an easy arrest. But he wants Reacher there, and won’t say why. The police can’t find him, but don’t have to, because he shows up on his own. He knows the sniper from his army days, and may have something to add to the case.
  10. The Hard Way: Reacher is drafted into a private security company to find the boss’s kidnapped wife and child. He’s back in the detective business suddenly, not sure who he can trust. The solution might surprise us all, Reacher included.
  11. Bad Luck and Trouble
  12. Nothing to Lose: Hope and Despair are two towns in Colorado that deserve their names. What’s going on in Despair, and why don’t they want Reacher around? Telling him to leave is a good way to get him to return, repeatedly, until he understands. Luckily there’s a cute cop in Hope who might be willing to help.
  13. Gone Tomorrow: Reacher spots a subway bomber with his expert eyes in the first pages, but it will take the whole book to find out what she really had in mind and why.
  14. 61 Hours: Winter in South Dakota would be nasty enough without a threatened prison riot and gosh-knows-what headed our way. Keep your eyes peeled for a heroic local librarian. 🙂
  15. Worth Dying For: A frightened town in Nebraska that wants Reacher to leave immediately obviously really needs him to stay and fight the bullies.
  16. The Affair comes out the day after tomorrow!! Hie thee to a bookstore! My library has it on order (hardback & on audio), but I’m going to wait til I’ve worked my way through them all before I get to the latest.

Also, The Second Son, a recent Reacher short story.

If you have been clicking these links, you may have noticed a few things. One: I didn’t read them in order. Or rather, I read a bunch of them out of order and then realized what a fan I had become, and went back and worked in order through the ones I’d missed, which may be a little silly but has been working for me. Two: I have polished my bloggingness: Some of those older posts exhibit qualities I have learned to avoid, like covering two books in one post (I only do this now in the rare digest-version post, like after a vacation), or NOT titling the post after the book. Sorry. I just have too many other interesting things to do, than go back and fix those old posts. From now on, polish.

Anybody else reading – or have you already read – all the Lee Child series of Jack Reacher novels? Any other fans out there? I know there are; he’s a popular guy… also know we’re not all fans. My Pops, for one, didn’t dig the 61 Hours audiobook I lent him. It sounds like it was the short-and-choppy writing style that did it for him (or, didn’t do it for him) as well as the significant suspension of disbelief required to get down with Reacher’s superheroness. He didn’t hate it, though. More so, Raych at books i done read appears to have hated Die Trying. Reading her review made me cringe (just a little) because I LOVE and she DIDN’T, but they can’t all please us all. How long the lines would be, if we all liked the same stuff! It’s okay, Raych, I forgive you. Everything she said of Reacher (or Child) was true; no arguments; just a different appeal to this different girl.

Have you read any? What’s your call?

3 Responses

  1. […] recently bothered you with a rundown of my reading of Reacher to date. While putting together that list, I realized that they fall into two categories for me: memorable, […]

  2. […] not, with the Indians and all, but Clint is a tough guy and I gotta say, I eat that shit up. (Jack Reacher, […]

  3. […] I saved this one for 2012, because it’s the last one I hadn’t read yet (not the last in the series, you realize, but the last that I got to). It was a treat, and now I’m left waiting for him […]

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